Stoner Cricket Club

Founded 1934
  Match Reports for 2003 

 

2003 Reports

The following fixtures took place, and the reports are below. To jump straight to a particular report click on the opposition's name in the list below.

Day

Date

Opposition

Venue

Start Time

Saturday

June 21st

Bedales

Bedales

2.15

Monday

July 21st

Wooburn Narks.

Bedales

2.00

Tuesday

July 22nd

M. Adams XI

Bedales

2.00

Wednesday

July 23rd

Steep

Steep

2.00

Thursday

July 24th

Carpe Diem

Bedales

2.00

Friday

July 25th

Ropley

Bedales

2.00

Sunday

July 27th

Goodwood

Goodwood

2.30

 2003 Statistics follow the match reports. To jump straight to them click HERE.

 

Stoner v Bedales

Saturday June 21st, 2003

After recent concerns about the state of school cricket and some doubts over whether this game would take place the good news is that not only did the game take place and feature some promising players, but also that staff enthusiasm and organisation seems to be on the rise as well and it is hoped that the future will see much stronger cricket sides at Bedales.

This year's game saw a hastily cobbled together Stoner side knock up 117-6 in 17 overs with Alex Odell top scorer with 46. In reply the school got the runs in 18 overs with 7 wickets down. The leading bowler appears to have been Chris Sanderson who took 4-14 in 3 overs, but a varied Stoner attack ensured a decent game and despite the shortness of the match it appears from all reports that pretty much everyone involved got a game and that the school team showed great promise.

 

Stoner v Wooburn Narkovians

Monday July 21st, 2003

Wooburn won toss

Wooburn 174 all out

Stoner 175-2

Stoner won by 8 wickets

For the second year in a row Wooburn won the toss and elected to bat first, and again struggled early in their innings. After Barney Green's first over had gone for 8 runs and 2 byes the scoring slowed dramatically - Barney following that over with 5 successive maidens and conceded only 5 more runs in total. Matt Evans was doing a passable impression of an accurate slow medium pace bowler at the other end, although still masquerading as an aggressive pace bowler, and he and Barney eventually took a wicket each. The young number 4 was soon tempted by Derek Roberts, and Colin Batey also took a wicket to reduce Wooburn to 42-4. This brought together Dave Small and Jeff Morris, two regular visitors and usually regular run scorers, Morris in particular frequently scoring heavily on this ground. Stoner were very relieved, and Morris distinctly peeved, when Small called for a quick single to square leg which Morris was slow to set off for. Ben Roberts swooped and returned the ball to Colin Baty who removed the bails with Morris stranded and run out for 0. Alan Cuthbert followed after a short revival, but although they were now 65-6 Wooburn still had batting to come. The number 8 was in the book as Mt. Tennant, which seemed a little harsh, although he was quite a solidly built chap. His batting was certainly not mountainlike as he moved his feet well to get into position to hit the spinners and used his bulk to hit the ball very hard. Derek Roberts rapily took himself out of the bowling attack, instead bringing Matthew Quantrill's very part time leg breaks into the firing line. There was considerable turn for Quantrill, though his lack of match practice (or any practice) meant there was also considerable variation of line and length, and Tennant went on the attack with relish. Two very hard chances and one fairly difficult one were missed in Quantrill's first over, and in his second a much simpler chance was put down before eventually one turned so much that Tennant was taken completely by surprise trying to pull to leg and lobbed one up back to the bowler, being out 2 runs short of his half century. With Ben Seddon picking up the wicket of Small shortly afterwards it was only a matter of time before the innings was wrapped up, with Derek Roberts bringing himself back on to finish things off/bowl at the rabbits. (Delete as applicable)

Stoner had narrowly failed to chase a similar score the previous year, but whether through the security of a strong batting line up or the feeling of control arising from having been on top in the field they set off with great confidence this time. Justin Jones and Oli Perigo both played positively, solid against the good balls but, in their very different ways, very powerful against anything loose. The youthful opening attack of Sturgess and Dale wilted under the pressure, and the change bowlers, Adam Morris and Dave Small initially fared little better. Just when it seemed that Stoner were on course for a lightning fast 10 wicket win Jones swished over the top of one from Morris and was bowled for 34, the opening partnership having produced 88 in just 10.5 overs. With Colin Batey playing out Small's next over for the only maiden of the innings (the next cheapest over went for 3!) the brakes were temporarily on. Normal service seemed to be resuming as 15 came from the next 8 balls before Oli Perigo's impressive innings came to an end when he tried to force Small to the leg side and was bowled for 38. Ben Roberts joined Baty and this time there was no dip in the run rate as Baty in particular hit the ball seemingly effortlessly to the boundary, though he did disappoint the crowd by playing a defensive shot to the third ball of a Jeff Morris over, having swung the first two way over deep square leg for 6. He went on to reach 51* off just 34 balls, despite the early maiden, and with Ben Roberts also scoring at a run a ball the win was brought up in the 23rd over with more than 15 of the 20 remaining. A comprehensive win was spoilt only by the fact that the scoreboard showed the number required to win, which was interpreted by the fielders, batsmen and umpires as being the first innings total, so that with the game actually already finished they played on for another 4 balls before another run was scored and they all came off! For this strange interlude Mr. Baty must take considerable responsibility as he was the one who had put the 'to win' amount on the board and was on the field when the score was reached!

 

Stoner v Mike Adams' XI

Tuesday July 22nd, 2003

Mike Adams XI 208-9 dec.

Stoner 139 all out

Mike Adams XI won by 69runs.

Roger Gilliat, longstanding foe of Stoner, and Justin Jones tossed up together and Mike Adams XI ended up batting. Useful spells from newcomer Alex Robinson and Ben Seddon kept the batsmen in check, though it wasn't until the 14th over that Ben made the breakthrough. The batsmen carried on undeterred, and the run rate increased sharply when Justin Jones brought himself on as second change. He followed the maxim of not setting a field for the bad ball, but sadly then proceeded to bowl mostly bad balls, which the batsmen successfully put into the gaps to the tune of 24 in 3 overs. Eventually a run out ended the innings of Les Wade for 47, James Davis was bowled by Robinson for 0 and an inspired bowling change brought on Jack Fray who hadn't bowled, he claimed, for some years. His run up, involving a sideways skip as he approached the crease and much whirling of arms and legs, including he claimed a kick up his own backside, provided much entertainment, but he produced a good first over with a poor last ball which was hit straight to Ed Ellis on the mid-wicket boundary. Fray could not produce another wicket and lost his rhythm in his last over to finish with 1-39 in 6 overs. The last bowling changes brought on Oli Perigo at slow medium and Olly Green bowling reluctant left arm spin. His first over was very loose and the batsmen were heard discussing the number of rank full tosses they could expect to get between overs, but one over was enough to loosen up the old maestro and he was soon on the spot extracting turn and varying his flight. With the help of some sharp catching by Jack Fray and a stumping in the final over when the desperate slog was on he ended up with 4-22 from 6.5 overs, a very respectable return. The fall of the ninth wicket brought the declaration, Roger Gilliat declining to give Olly the chance of a fifth wicket.

With another strong batting line up Stoner felt that 208 was within their grasp, but the opening bowling was a little different from the previous days. Dan Wade opened up with fair pace and some steep bounce, but more interesting was the 7 year old (well he looked about 7 anyway…) Chris Morgan. Bowling left arm round he turned the ball considerably to beat Jack Fray with his first two balls, before having him caught behind by a wicket-keeper approximately 10 times his age with the third ball, thus securing Jack the honour of the first nomination for the new Stoner Duck cup. With Wade reasonably accurate and quick and Morgan turning the ball from a good line and length Stoner started with 6 successive maidens, with just one leg bye getting the board moving. Eventually Adrian Hill pushed a single off Wade and Matthew Quantrill then squeezed him away for 4, and the runs started to flow a little more freely. Quantrill particularly played Morgan with reasonable ease, punching him through the off side whenever he was able to get on the back foot and otherwise defending soundly. Hill also swatted a few slightly short ones over mid on, and the pair added 51 for the second wicket before Hill found a fielder in the deep for 21. Justin Jones then hit 18 off the first five balls of a Morgan over and might have knocked him out of the attack had he not swished at a slower well flighted one and been bowled by the last ball. Ben Roberts followed shortly, skying Morgan again to become the second Duck Cup nomination. Although the run rate had improved a bit after the very slow start Stoner still needed over 6 an over from the last 20 and two maidens in the first two, including the wicket maiden in which Ben Roberts was out pushed the required rate up to 7. Matthew Quantrill and Ed Ellis looked for a while as if they might make a good stab at it as they added 40 for the fifth wicket in just 5 overs, but Quantrill having reached 56 was beaten going down the track to one that didn't bounce from Mike Martin, the first batsman not to get out to Morgan. Ed Ellis did get out to Morgan almost immediately afterwards, and from there Stoner subsided rapidly to defeat. Morgan continued to snap up wickets as batsman swung too hard and with too little control, including a further Duck Cup nomination for Oli Perigo. Morgan finished with figures of 17-4-82-8, deprived of the ninth wicket when the game was ended by Alex Robinson being bowled for another duck by Chris Wade. A comprehensive defeat, but a privilege to see such an excellent display of control and prodigious spin from one so young, and a name to remember for the future as those who did take runs off him may want to brag about it if he does go on to the higher things that some observers today were predicting for him.

Stoner v Steep

Wednesday July 23rd, 2003

Stoner won toss

Stoner 215-8 declared

Steep 216-9

Steep won by 1 wicket

Matt Evans was once again captain for the match for the Wicksteed Trophy, but had sterner opposition in the shape of Damian Morley as captain and a stronger Steep squad than has often been the case in recent years. Nonetheless Evans, flushed with success after scoring a fifty on Saturday chose to open the batting himself with Matthew Quantrill, and although not at the highest pace the pair progressed well, putting on 69 for the first wicket and comfortably seeing off the opening bowlers before one from Rudi Antrobus kept low and shot on to pin Quantrill LBW in front of the stumps. Ben Roberts looked in good touch, but unlike Quantrill he didn't have the good sense to realise that Evans' calling of runs is largely bluff and tried to take a second run that was never on to Colin Baty's arm. Gordon Dale followed shortly afterwards LBW to one that might have been a touch high, but Ben Seddon joined Evans in continuing to build the foundations for a big total. However although Evans moved on to probably his highest ever score for Stoner if not for anyone in reaching 72 the spin of Morley and Baty accounted for both him and Seddon, and Justin Jones could not get going, scraping 6 before holing out on the boundary. Paul Hutt and Barney Green were also run out in the pursuit of quick runs, though Green did make a quick 28 and Stoner eventually declared on 215-8.

In reply Steep struggled against the pace of Alex Robinson and Barney Green, and later against the slower seam of Ben Seddon. Green did struggle slightly with no balls, which looked as if it might be costly when he shattered Colin Baty's stumps off a no ball, but fortunately Baty chipped the very next ball straight to Matt Evans at mid off and no damage was done to the Stoner cause. Four of the top five were back in the pavilion before 60 was on the board, and they were well behind the run rate. Adrian Hill and Ed Ellis started to accelerate against Justin Jones, but what was, in hindsight, the real turning point of the game came early in Chris Sanderson's spell when a ball straightened and shot along the ground to hit Ellis on the foot right in front of middle stump. Inexplicably the umpire failed to raise his finger and from then on Ellis and Hill made hay, striking anything slightly loose with great power to various parts of the field. The run rate had crept over 7 an over early in the twenty overs, but a few good overs brought it tumbling down below 6. Jones, Sanderson and Jack Fray all suffered, though Sanderson did pick up a deserved wicket when he bowled Hill for 62. The new batsman Turnbull was very strong off his legs, and the equation was now distinctly in Steep's favour. Matt Evans finally brought himself on, but although reducing the rate at which runs were being scored he could not totally control it, and Alex Robinson could also not quite manage to bowl a full 6 good balls an over. When Barney Green was brought back on with 5 overs remaining just 26 runs were needed with 5 wickets still in hand. Green, however, soon bowled Turnbull and followed up with Smith LBW in the same over. A reasonably tight over from Evans seemed to move things back in Stoner's favour, but his last ball strayed down the leg side and a full swing of the bat from Rudi Antrobus saw it disappear over the fine leg boundary for 6. 12 needed off three overs, but again Green responded, bowling Ed Ellis for 48. Quick scampering of ones and twos by Antrobus and John Black again seemed to have put Steep in charge, with just 3 needed off the final over, but after Antrobus had taken a single off the first ball Green took his sixth wicket (he ended up with 6-28) by bowling Black to bring in Mike Jones at number 11, a batsman not renowned for run scoring! Two solid defensive shots left two needed off two balls, but then disastrously for Stoner a slower ball from Green was called a no ball, and off the next ball an edge from Jones evaded the short third man and the winning run was scampered. A dramatic finish saw the Wicksteed Trophy handed over to Steep for the first time in many a year, but the closeness of the game meant that there were numerous incidents throughout the game that could be pointed to as having affected the result, fuel, of course, for much debate and blame casting in the dressing room and pub!

 

Stoner v Carpe Diem

Thursday July 24th, 2003

Stoner won toss

Carpe Diem 114 all out

Stoner 115-7

Stoner won by 3 wickets

Watering and overnight rain resulted in a soft and slow pitch for this match, and Stoner took full advantage after winning the toss and electing to bowl first. Captain Matthew Quantrill was concerned about the possible shortage of bowling against a powerful batting line up, but Connor Wilkinson in his first full match of the season exploited the conditions superbly. With Carpe Diem missing the Fenton brothers, who have given their innings flying starts in previous encounters, Wilkinson and Barney Green were able to keep things very tight, and eventually in the 11th over Wilkinson wore down the patience of Vaughan John who tried to force him away and was bowled. A second wicket followed very shortly as Gary Browning threw his bat at Wilkinson's worst ball, a long hop outside off stump and lobbed it up to Ben Roberts at cover. Worse was to follow for Carpe Diem as the experienced Polly Flinders, who had looked as if he would play the sort of anchor role necessary to build a big total in these conditions was run out when James Thorn called a single thinking the ball had beaten Jack Fray only for Fray to stick out a hand, collect the ball cleanly and get it in to the stumps in plenty of time to beat Flinders. Thorn was almost immediately out LBW to Ben Seddon, and Carpe Diem were struggling at 28-4. Steve Hurst and Australian Kevin Ginn staged a mini-revival, adding 23 for the 5th wicket, mainly courtesy of a batch of 3 successive leg side balls bowled by Ben Seddon to the powerful Australian, who despatched them all with ease. He was less able to cope with the more traditional English virtues of slow medium pace on a sticky wicket, though, and was bowled by Wilkinson with a beauty that cut back into him clipping his pad on the way to the stumps. Hurst was out in the next over, skying Seddon and being well caught by Oli Perigo running across from mid on, and when Wilkinson bowled John Barton for a duck in the next over Carpe Diem were once again in deep strife at 54-7. Wilkinson was removed from the attack having taken 4-16 in 12 overs against a powerful array of batsmen, and had even done enough to earn an ovation from a highly critical crowd (Britten, Roberts and Mosely-Williams). With Ben Seddon immediately giving away more legside runs to young Matthew Scanlan he was also removed from the attack with 2-36 from 6 overs and Stoner resorted to spin from Steep pair Alex Bone and Ed Ellis. Bone turned the ball too much initially, giving away a couple of wides, and being hit to leg, but once under control bowled a tidy spell without a lot of luck. Ellis, meanwhile, was another who had hardly played all season but quickly settled into a rhythm. Although Scanlan continued to pick up runs Ellis removed Matt Meehan, caught and bowled, and Rob Newmarch caught behind. Ian Linsdell, a very handy number 11, gave Scanlan solid support as they added 17 for the last wicket, and when Scanlan was on 49 (having never made a 50) he could hardly have been offered a more generous gift than Justin Jones being brought on to bowl, as Mike Russell had refused to attempt to raise his arm far enough to turn it over. Despite having seen Jones bowl before when he played a week for Stoner in 2001 Scanlan could still not resist charging down the wicket to him and missing. Despite the slow pace of the ball he could not get back before the ball reached the keeper and he was stumped to bring the innings to an end on 114.

Although Stoner had a strong batting line up the conditions were not easy and a total over 100 was not to be sniffed at. Mike Russell and Oli Perigo survived the half hour that had to be batted out before tea, looking very comfortable, particularly in their running which they took in a very leisurely manner. Almost immediately after tea, though, Perigo was out LBW to Ian Linsdell and the slow bowling of Linsdell and Polly Flinders exerted a strong grip on Stoner's batsmen, who were mostly reluctant to allow themselves to be tied down. Mike Russell was well caught by a diving Kevin Ginn, and Fray was bowled by Linsdell, his score lower than it should have been because of the reluctance of Russell to run, particularly for anything that he thought might reach the boundary. One particularly memorable moment saw Fray drive to the extra cover boundary with the ball stopping just inside the line. By this time Fray had reached the non-striker's end where Russell was still standing and watching the ball. When he realised it had stopped he ambled a single in the time that most of the younger elements of the side might have run 3! Ben Roberts was batting very sensibly at number 4, and initially Justin Jones was also hitting the ball around gently, working the ones and twos. However Jones could not stay restrained for long, particularly against the very occasional bowling of Gary Browning. Having hit him out of the ground once, though, he the failed to repeat the shot, being very well caught by Vaughan John who took the catch walking backwards and stopped with his heel raised over, but not touching, the boundary line. Barney Green and Ben Seddon both failed to cope with the slow pace of the pitch and were out getting through shots too early against the slow bowling of Flinders, but Ben Roberts continued batting very well, and he and Ed Ellis took the score to 100 before Roberts finally succumbed to the quicker bowling of Kevin Ginn, having made 38 invaluable runs. This brought in Matthew Quantrill against a team consisting mainly of his current or ex-teammates, and there was plenty of banter going on as they tried to pressure him. However he stood firm against 2.1 overs from Ginn, though twice failing to put away loose balls, and ended up 0* as Ed Ellis knocked off the required runs at the other end. In the end despite the low scores it was an entertaining and close match, and seemed to be enjoyed by almost all who played in it, and after a good evening at the Harrow good-byes were said with wishes for another game next year.

 

Stoner v Ropley

Friday July 25th, 2003

Rain

Rain

Rain

Rain

RAIN!!!!

 

Stoner v Goodwood

Sunday July 27th, 2003

Stoner 174-8 Declared

Goodwood 153-9

Draw

Following the controversial match last year against Goodwood, which was dominated by Australian ringers, Stoner were able to put out a full side of more or less genuine Stoner members or at least people with some claim to a connection to Stoner. On paper it was a weaker side than either of the previous two years, but in the end the result was the same with Goodwood clinging on determinedly for the draw.

Things had not started well for Stoner when Matthew Quantrill was out first ball. With the keeper standing up and slip only a few feet away the ball lifted sharply at a respectable pace and took an edge straight towards the slip's face. Had it not been heading straight at him he would probably never have caught it, but the prospect of a ball between the eyes does wonders for the reflexes! At the other end Oli Perigo started with two successive fours, but was bowled by the next ball, leaving Stoner 11-2 with both openers out after just 9 balls. Justin Jones smote a few lusty blows before inevitably failing to clear a fielder and Barney Green also couldn't adapt to the slow pitch, prodding one back to the bowler to leave Stoner on 51-4. However Ben Seddon was playing solidly, pulling particularly well and also driving through the covers whenever he was given the chance, and he was joined by Olly Green, who creaked a bit to start with but soon starting hitting with some of his old power, knocking one bowler (Richard Geffen) out of the attack when he foolishly attempted to catch a straight drive and injured his finger. This pair added 66 for the fifth wicket before Seddon was stumped charging James Miles and then falling flat on his back as he attempted to regain his ground, having made an excellent 51. Matt Evans joined Green and despite Evans' tutelage Green continued to score well as they added 40 before Green was caught on the boundary for 46, falling just a few feet short of reaching his 50 in spectacular fashion. A few more scampered runs from Evans and some hard swings from young Mark Hobbs brought the declaration at 174-8 just after 5 o'clock.

One of the late replacements, Chris Devine, and 16 year old Mark Hobbs opened the bowling on their Stoner debuts, and both performed admirably barring the very occasional loose ball. Both might have taken more wickets on a luckier day, but in the end only Hobbs got one, though Devine went for just 14 in 8 overs and Hobbs took 1-16 in 6. However Stoner's options had been somewhat curtailed in the second over when Barney Green had made a great effort to catch a hard slash through the covers but in getting his hand to it managed to dislocate and badly cut his little finger, forcing him to leave immediately for hospital. Fielding for almost the entire innings with 10 men and with their most likely wicket taking bowler missing Stoner responded well. Following the fine opening spells by youth bowlers it was the turn of experience next with Oli Green being persuaded to put in a spell in the absence of his son and Geoff Hobbs bowling at the other end. Oli beat the bat a number of times, and was unlucky in the end to take just 1-39, while Hobbs was also very accurate and took 3-18 in his 8 overs. Goodwood, having started slowly were now looking to go on the attack, but were failing to break the shackles imposed by the seamers and the quality spin of Olly Green. With time running out to take the remaining wickets and the run rate now approaching 8 an over Matthew Quantrill turned to his own occasional legspin, and was immediately rewarded with a wicket with his first ball, Mark Hobbs taking the catch comfortably at deep mid on. Matt Evans then came on to try and bowl spin at the other end, but was unable to get a great deal of turn. Quantrill was getting more turn, but lacking control of line and length. Three successive balls were called wide in his next over, including one that missed leg stump by less than 6 inches and seemed an inexplicable decision by the umpire. Quantrill made his point in the best possible way by hitting middle stump with his next ball and took a wicket with the first ball of his next over as well. At the beginning of the 18th over of the last 20 30 runs were needed, but off the first ball Quantrill took his 4th wicket, a good catch by Justin Jones at mid wicket. This was the 7th catch of the innings, and while none of them were sensational none were easy either and all were held with complete certainty, by contrast to some of Stoner's ground fielding! Unfortunately the fall of the ninth wicket was the signal for Goodwood to shut up shop, and while it may not have been surprising that they now felt the win was beyond them the extent to which the batsmen now became negative was very disappointing from a team that had been upset by Stoner's failure to open the game up last year. Not only did the batsmen refuse to try and hit anything other than a very dead bat defensive shot to balls on the wicket, no matter how tempting the bowling, but they also resorted to deliberately kicking away balls that might otherwise have been wides to make sure they didn't have to face any extra balls. This made for a rather sad end to what had otherwise been an entertaining and evenly balanced game throughout, but did help to improve Matthew Quantrill's economy rate as he finished with 4-28 in 5 overs.

 

2003 Statistics

Stoner Batting Averages 2003

Qualification: 1 Completed Innings

Pos.

Player

Games

Inns.

NO's

Runs

Hi-Score

Average

1

O Green

2

2

1

46

46

46.00

2

A Odell

1

1

0

46

46

46.00

3

M Evans

3

2

0

90

72

45.00

4

E Ellis

2

2

1

38

20*

38.00

5

M Quantrill

5

4

1

88

56

29.33

6

B Roberts

4

4

1

75

38

25.00

7

B Seddon

5

4

0

87

51

21.75

8

A Hill

1

1

0

21

21

21.00

9

J Jones

6

6

0

107

34

17.83

10

B Taylor

2

1

0

16

16

16.00

11

O Perigo

4

4

0

56

38

14.00

12

P Hutt

1

1

0

14

14

14.00

13

B Green

4

3

0

38

28

12.67

14

C Wilkinson

2

1

0

9

9

9.00

15

C Sanderson

2

2

1

8

7

8.00

16

J Smith

1

1

0

8

8

8.00

17

M Hobbs

1

1

0

8

8

8.00

18

M Russell

1

1

0

4

4

4.00

19

J Fray

4

4

1

10

9

3.33

20

G Dale

2

1

0

2

2

2.00

21

A Robinson

2

1

0

0

0

0.00

Also Batted, but not Qualified for the Averages

1

C Baty

1

1

1

51

51*

******

2

D Roberts

2

1

1

19

19*

******

3

J Howland

1

1

1

0

0*

******

4

A Bone

1

0

0

0

0

------

5

A Noman

1

0

0

0

0

------

6

C Devine

1

0

0

0

0

------

7

G Hobbs

1

0

0

0

0

------

8

G Taylor

1

0

0

0

0

------

9

T Allen

1

0

0

0

0

------

10

W Amesbury

1

0

0

0

0

------

Stoner Bowling Averages 2003

Qualification: 1 Wicket Taken

Pos.

Player

Overs

Mdns.

Runs

Wkts.

Best

R/Over

Average

1

G Hobbs

8

3

18

3

3-18

2.25

6.00

2

B Green

26

8

50

8

6-28

1.92

6.25

3

C Wilkinson

13

5

27

4

4-16

2.08

6.75

4

E Ellis

6

1

21

2

2-21

3.50

10.50

5

M Quantrill

8

1

57

5

4-28

7.13

11.40

6

C Baty

7

1

23

2

2-23

3.29

11.50

7

O Green

15.5

2

61

5

4-22

3.85

12.20

8

C Sanderson

9

1

61

5

4-14

6.78

12.20

9

O Perigo

6

1

13

1

1-13

2.17

13.00

10

M Hobbs

6

1

16

1

1-16

2.67

16.00

11

D Roberts

12.2

0

52

3

2-48

4.22

17.33

12

B Seddon

25

3

109

5

2-36

4.36

21.80

13

J Jones

11.2

0

67

3

2-15

5.91

22.33

14

A Robinson

18

2

62

2

1-26

3.44

31.00

15

J Fray

9

0

61

1

1-39

6.78

61.00

16

M Evans

21

4

82

1

1-26

3.90

82.00

Also Bowled, but not Qualified for the Averages

1

J Smith

8

0

41

0

0-41

5.13

-----

2

C Devine

8

1

14

0

0-14

1.75

-----

3

A Bone

7

1

26

0

0-26

3.71

-----

4

A Noman

4

0

26

0

0-26

6.50

-----

5

G Taylor

3

0

29

0

0-29

9.67

-----

6

W Amesbury

2

0

22

0

0-22

11.00

-----

Leading Batting Performances

72

M Evans

v Steep

on 23/7/2003

56

M Quantrill

v Mike Adams' XI

on 22/7/2003

51*

C Baty

v Wooburn Narkovians

on 21/7/2003

51

B Seddon

v Goodwood

on 27/7/2003

46

A Odell

v Bedales

on 21/6/2003

46

O Green

v Goodwood

on 27/7/2003

38

O Perigo

v Wooburn Narkovians

on 21/7/2003

38

B Roberts

v Carpe Diem

on 24/7/2003

34

J Jones

v Wooburn Narkovians

on 21/7/2003

32

M Quantrill

v Steep

on 23/7/2003

Leading Bowling Performances

6-28

B Green

v Steep

on 23/7/2003

4-14

C Sanderson

v Bedales

on 21/6/2003

4-16

C Wilkinson

v Carpe Diem

on 24/7/2003

4-22

O Green

v Mike Adams' XI

on 22/7/2003

4-28

M Quantrill

v Goodwood

on 27/7/2003

3-18

G Hobbs

v Goodwood

on 27/7/2003

The Duck Cup

Name

Ducks

Innings

Duck %age

J Fray

2

4

50%

A Robinson

1

1

100%

O Perigo

1

4

25%

B Roberts

1

4

25%

M Quantrill

1

4

25%

Catches

5

M Quantrill

3

E Ellis

2

J Jones

2

J Fray

2

O Perigo

2

B Roberts

2

B Seddon

1

D Roberts

1

M Evans

1

A Robinson

1

M Hobbs

Stumpings

3

B Taylor

2

M Quantrill